Tags

, , ,

I am regularly asked why there are so few Cloud OSS, or OSS as a Service, options when AWS / GCP and Azure all have IoT plays. I have also wondered why no systems integrator has deployed ONAP on AWS (or other). The following are the main reasons why I think such an option has not yet become popular for CSPs & vendors.

12 Reasons Why Cloud OSS hasn’t happened so far:

  1. Network operators are risk averse
    • That’s a very good thing as CSPs protect your data in flight and at rest. Security is critical for CSPs. However, this does not mean that a Cloud OSS cannot be used just that the appropriate security measures need to be in place
  2. Network operators have customers that are even more risk averse
    • That’s a very good thing too and CSPs have to take account of their customers requirements. However, a private cloud or a public cloud can be secured in the same way as a private data centre. The OSS must make sure that it is not persisting customer data or exposing network functions.
  3. Cloud OSS creates another attack vector and dude we’ve got enough of those
    • We sure do. But internally hosted OSS is itself a risk / attack vector. The benefit of Cloud OSS is that it should allow a simplification / reduction of the number of OSS stacks within the CSP
  4. OSS must be internal because of Data regulation and on-shoring / safe-harbouring of data
    • OSS systems should not be persisting customer data (EVER even Static IP addresses!). So, data regulation requirements will only have limited application. OSS data must be secured at rest and in transit. The low latency requirements of OSS will require near hosting.
  5. Few network operators have sufficient levels of virtualised network functions
    • This is changing rapidly and 5G technologies will be predominantly virtualised
  6. The cost of the OSS is always a low proportion of the costs of the network
    • This is true but does not stop the need to gain greater platform efficiencies.
  7. Moving to the cloud will not wipe away the legacy
    • Of course, it won’t but it will help focus of the future and pass management of VNFs to a single master. PNF management will always be a challenge.
  8. The OPEX model is not always beneficial
    • This is true but OSS stovepipes are not cheap. Best of breed SaaS will help spread the cost and not create a lock in to a single technology version.
  9. It’s the OSS, those guys don’t move quickly
    • A classic refrain but not a reason not to move to a Cloud OSS
  10. The streaming data pipe will be too fat and the latency will be too slow to fix items quickly
    • This is a genuine concern and will required a data pipeline architecture with streaming inside the network and OSS components residing outside. Intent based programming with specific levels of management at the different layers will be key to answering the low latency requirement. Especially when control is part of a network slice management function.
  11. The BSS will never be in the Cloud
    • Salesforce, GCP, AWS, Pega, Oracle Cloud, Azure are all changing that model. Especially in the IoT space.
  12. The OSS will never be in the Cloud
    • Watch this space….